These hoes ain’t loyal

(Source: bornback-wards)

Be picky with who you invest your time in, wasted time is worse than wasted money.

trickster-sockdolager:

sextnoise:

this girl is going places 

The wink at the end though

(Source: prismcess)

pretty-period:

In Celebration of Women’s History MonthYaya (DeCosta) Alafia is #PrettyPeriod

pretty-period:

In Celebration of Women’s History Month
Yaya (DeCosta) Alafia is #PrettyPeriod

The best project you’ll ever work on is you.
blackfashion:

Denise Vasi at Balmain AW 2014
Photoraphed by Armenyl

blackfashion:

Denise Vasi at Balmain AW 2014

Photoraphed by Armenyl

steppauseturnpausepivotstepstep:

babybutta:

yarrahs-life:

high-power-prolific:

thehereticpharaoh:

People really don’t believe Ancient Egyptians were ethnically African?

They referred to themselves, not as ”Egyptians” (a Greek term) , but as ”Kemmui’’, meaning, ”the blacks”.
The country itself they called, Kemet, or black nation.
'Kem' is the term for black in the ancient Egyptian language. It is represented in hieroglyphs by a stick charred at both ends.”
"km.t, the name of Ancient Egypt in Egyptian; Egypt (Coptic: Kemi)
r n km.t, the native term for the Egyptian language
(Ref: The Egyptian Hieroglyphic Dictionary, Vols 1&2, E.A. Budge, Dover.) 
Note: words inside brackets are the determinatives or word classifiers along with their English meanings.
Kem, kame, kmi, kmem, kmom = to be black 
Kememu = Black people (Ancient Egyptians) in both Ancient and modern Egyptian (Kmemou).
Kem [khet][wood] = extremely black, jet-black
Kemet = any black thing. Note: “t” is silent - pronounced Kemé
Kemet [nu][community, settlement, nation] = Black nation = Ancient Egypt.  
Kemet [Romé][people] = Black people. Ancient Egyptians. 
Kemit [Shoit][books] = Black books, Ancient Egyptian literature.  
Kem wer [miri][large body of water] = The Great Black sea (The Red sea). This sea is neither black nor red, this is in reference to which nation, Black or Red, at a particular time, controlled this body of water. 
Kemi fer = Black double house; seat of government. Note: by reference to Wolof again, we know that to make a plural of per or house, the “p” becomes an “f” or fer. Thus fero=great houses (double), it is not pero as Budge writes.
In Ancient Egyptian, the ordinary adjective always follows the noun it modifies, whereas a sanctified adjective usually comes before its noun.  The sanctified adjectives are:
Kem —  Black
Suten -  Royal
Nter —-  Holy, Sacred
Examples:
Kem ti = Black image, sacred image : ti oubash = white image  
Kem ho = Black face/title of a god   : ho oubash = white face  
Kem ta = Black land, holy land        : Ta deshret = Red land (also; Ta Sett) 
This rule does not apply when Black is used as a noun-adjective of nationality:  
Hompt Kemet = copper of Black; Egyptian copper :  Hompt Sett = copper of the Red nations; Asiatic copper  
Ro in Kemet (page 416a) = speech of Black; mute ro n Kemet = word of the mouth of Black; the Egyptian language
Kemet Deshret = Black and Red; good and evil; fertile and barren, etc.; Duality  
Deshretu (page 554a,b) = red ones, red devils.  Used also to refer to the Namu and Tamhu; not a complimentary label. 
African Origins: 
The following Ancient Egyptian words acknowledge the origins of Pharaonic Egyptian civilization; 
Khentu Hon Nefer (page 554a) = founders of the Excellent Order. Budge: “peoples and tribes of Nubia and the Egyptian Sudan.” For “Hon” see page 586b. 
Hon Nefer (page 1024b) = Excellent Order
Kenus (page1024b) = mighty; brave (from Kenu, page 772a)
Ta Khent (page 1051b/page 554b) = land of the beginning.  
Eau (page 952b/page 17b) = the old country  
Ancient Egyptian’s Worldview:  
The Egyptian’s view of the world was the exact opposite of the current Western one. To the Egyptian, the top of the world was in the south (upper) towards the African interior, the bottom (lower) towards the north, hence upper and lower Egypt; upper and lower Syria.”
"Oh yes, the black soil business.
Most scholars outside the modern western cover-up establishment have rejected the false interpretation some have given to Kemet, ostensibly alluding the term Kemet to the alleged ”black soil”  of Egypt. There’s nothing in the term, outside the imagination of western myth-makers,  to suggest the Egyptians referred to the color of the soil or sand, rather than the people, in naming their country. Our position is consistent with the testimony of the ancient Greek writers, eyewitnesses who unanimously described the Egyptians as a black people, closely related to the ”Ethiopians”.”

And white Hollywood casts white actors and gives them tans.

*internal sobbing*

i will never not reblog this. i know too many people who for real dont think Egypt is a part of Africa.

steppauseturnpausepivotstepstep:

babybutta:

yarrahs-life:

high-power-prolific:

thehereticpharaoh:

People really don’t believe Ancient Egyptians were ethnically African?

They referred to themselves, not as ”Egyptians” (a Greek term) , but as ”Kemmui’’, meaning, ”the blacks”.

The country itself they called, Kemet, or black nation.

'Kem' is the term for black in the ancient Egyptian language. It is represented in hieroglyphs by a stick charred at both ends.”

"km.t, the name of Ancient Egypt in Egyptian; Egypt (Coptic: Kemi)

r n km.t, the native term for the Egyptian language

(Ref: The Egyptian Hieroglyphic Dictionary, Vols 1&2, E.A. Budge, Dover.) 

Note: words inside brackets are the determinatives or word classifiers along with their English meanings.

Kem, kame, kmi, kmem, kmom = to be black 

Kememu = Black people (Ancient Egyptians) in both Ancient and modern Egyptian (Kmemou).

Kem [khet][wood] = extremely black, jet-black

Kemet = any black thing. Note: “t” is silent - pronounced Kemé

Kemet [nu][community, settlement, nation] = Black nation = Ancient Egypt.  

Kemet [Romé][people] = Black people. Ancient Egyptians. 

Kemit [Shoit][books] = Black books, Ancient Egyptian literature.  

Kem wer [miri][large body of water] = The Great Black sea (The Red sea). This sea is neither black nor red, this is in reference to which nation, Black or Red, at a particular time, controlled this body of water. 

Kemi fer = Black double house; seat of government. Note: by reference to Wolof again, we know that to make a plural of per or house, the “p” becomes an “f” or fer. Thus fero=great houses (double), it is not pero as Budge writes.

In Ancient Egyptian, the ordinary adjective always follows the noun it modifies, whereas a sanctified adjective usually comes before its noun.  The sanctified adjectives are:

Kem —  Black

Suten -  Royal

Nter —-  Holy, Sacred

Examples:

Kem ti = Black image, sacred image : ti oubash = white image  

Kem ho = Black face/title of a god   : ho oubash = white face  

Kem ta = Black land, holy land        : Ta deshret = Red land (also; Ta Sett) 

This rule does not apply when Black is used as a noun-adjective of nationality:  

Hompt Kemet = copper of Black; Egyptian copper :  Hompt Sett = copper of the Red nations; Asiatic copper  

Ro in Kemet (page 416a) = speech of Black; mute ro n Kemet = word of the mouth of Black; the Egyptian language

Kemet Deshret = Black and Red; good and evil; fertile and barren, etc.; Duality  

Deshretu (page 554a,b) = red ones, red devils.  Used also to refer to the Namu and Tamhu; not a complimentary label. 

African Origins: 

The following Ancient Egyptian words acknowledge the origins of Pharaonic Egyptian civilization; 

Khentu Hon Nefer (page 554a) = founders of the Excellent Order. Budge: “peoples and tribes of Nubia and the Egyptian Sudan.” For “Hon” see page 586b. 

Hon Nefer (page 1024b) = Excellent Order

Kenus (page1024b) = mighty; brave (from Kenu, page 772a)

Ta Khent (page 1051b/page 554b) = land of the beginning.  

Eau (page 952b/page 17b) = the old country  

Ancient Egyptian’s Worldview:  

The Egyptian’s view of the world was the exact opposite of the current Western one. To the Egyptian, the top of the world was in the south (upper) towards the African interior, the bottom (lower) towards the north, hence upper and lower Egypt; upper and lower Syria.”

"Oh yes, the black soil business.

Most scholars outside the modern western cover-up establishment have rejected the false interpretation some have given to Kemet, ostensibly alluding the term Kemet to the alleged ”black soil”  of Egypt. There’s nothing in the term, outside the imagination of western myth-makers,  to suggest the Egyptians referred to the color of the soil or sand, rather than the people, in naming their country. Our position is consistent with the testimony of the ancient Greek writers, eyewitnesses who unanimously described the Egyptians as a black people, closely related to the ”Ethiopians”.”

And white Hollywood casts white actors and gives them tans.

*internal sobbing*

i will never not reblog this. i know too many people who for real dont think Egypt is a part of Africa.

black-culture:

You are invited to submit a 1-2 page autobiographical essay or first person creative nonfiction(essays/memoirs) for this anthology .
The aim of Our Black is to create a book comprised of narratives on the Black Experience and the multiplicity of Blackness. The goal of Our Black is to build a collection of narratives that reflect the diverse experiences of Black folk, one which could be used to better understand the complexity, depth, and challenges of Being and living Black.
The book Our Black will be divided into these thematic chapters:
Acceptance and Ambiguous Blackness: Multi-Racial Identity in AmericaBe A Man: The Burden of Black MasculinityBinary Minorities: Being Both Black and LGBTQ(IA)Never Black Enough: Outside the Scope of Legitimate BlacknessThe Intersection of Gender and Race: Being a black woman in americaNot Quite African-American: Black immigrants and First generation AmericansBlack Self Identity: How Much is Blackness Defined by Whiteness?
If interested please send us an email at ourblackproject[@]gmail.com for more information and a copy of our writers’ guidelines. We will be accepting submissions until March 1, 2014.
Please feel free to share this post as you please. I am truly blessed to be working on a project such as this and I am driven by its potential. With much work and dedication, this can be turned into something phenomenal.
All the best,
zellie imani

black-culture:

You are invited to submit a 1-2 page autobiographical essay or first person creative nonfiction(essays/memoirs) for this anthology .

The aim of Our Black is to create a book comprised of narratives on the Black Experience and the multiplicity of Blackness. The goal of Our Black is to build a collection of narratives that reflect the diverse experiences of Black folk, one which could be used to better understand the complexity, depth, and challenges of Being and living Black.

The book Our Black will be divided into these thematic chapters:

Acceptance and Ambiguous Blackness: Multi-Racial Identity in America
Be A Man: The Burden of Black Masculinity
Binary Minorities: Being Both Black and LGBTQ(IA)
Never Black Enough: Outside the Scope of Legitimate Blackness
The Intersection of Gender and Race: Being a black woman in america
Not Quite African-American: Black immigrants and First generation Americans
Black Self Identity: How Much is Blackness Defined by Whiteness?

If interested please send us an email at ourblackproject[@]gmail.com for more information and a copy of our writers’ guidelines. We will be accepting submissions until March 1, 2014.

Please feel free to share this post as you please. I am truly blessed to be working on a project such as this and I am driven by its potential. With much work and dedication, this can be turned into something phenomenal.

All the best,

zellie imani

(Source: specialnights)

The Negro artist works against an undertow of sharp criticism and misunderstanding from his own group and unintentional bribes from the whites. “Oh, be respectable, write about nice people, show how good we are,” say the Negroes. “Be stereotyped, don’t go too far, don’t shatter our illusions about you, don’t amuse us too seriously. We will pay you,” say the whites….An artist must be free to choose what he does, certainly, but he must also never be afraid to do what he must choose….We younger Negro artists who create now intend to express our individual dark-skinned selves without fear or shame. If white people are pleased we are glad. If they are not, it doesn’t matter. We know we are beautiful. And ugly too…. If colored people are pleased we are glad. If they are not, their displeasure doesn’t matter either. We build our temples for tomorrow, strong as we know how, and we stand on top of the mountain, free within ourselves.

(Source: divalocity)

As a Black community, we must define blackness by the activity of our minds rather than the literal, physical objectivity which binds.
babyl0bes:

hungryhungryhiddles:

travelingbythoughts:

this is the greatest thing i’ve ever seen

THIS GIF LITERALLY JUST MADE MY ENTIRE WEEK A THOUSAND TIMES BETTER

He’s just so happy

babyl0bes:

hungryhungryhiddles:

travelingbythoughts:

this is the greatest thing i’ve ever seen

THIS GIF LITERALLY JUST MADE MY ENTIRE WEEK A THOUSAND TIMES BETTER

He’s just so happy

(Source: camiivalee)